Tag Archives: spells

NIGHTBITCH: Connecticut Metal Tyrants To Unleash New 12” Lyric Video Hosted By Invisible Oranges Available

Connecticut metal tyrants NIGHTBITCH will unleash their latest Danzigian/Blackmore-driven bone metal anthems with the three-song Chainmaker 12”. Set for release on March 26, 2013 via Ear One Productions, Chainmaker serves as a precursor to the band’s upcoming full-length.

Elaborates guitarist Ryan “His Emissary” Adams of the offering: Chainmaker is the bastard offspring of the nudie mag in your dad’s closet and the Killers tape in your older brother’s Firebird. It’s what’s in your Walkman on your way to meet the cheerleader with the red hair under the bleachers after detention so she can show you her new tattoo. It’s what happens when you grow up with your Priest vinyl a little too close to your Lisa Ann VHS tapes. Misfits and Samhain original pressings and Jess Franco laserdiscs on your bedroom wall. Denim and Hell. Riffs and sleaze. FUCK OFF NOWADAYS HEAVY METAL!”

 

Chainmaker will be released as a one-sided vinyl 12″ in a limited quantity of 250 and available digitally via iTunes and bandcamp.

 

In celebration of its impending release, Invisible Oranges is currently hosting the “Chainmaker” lyric video.  Point your peepers toTHIS LOCATION and embrace the sleaze.

 

Chainmaker Track Listing:

1. Chainmaker

2. Disrober

3. Into the Fire (Deep Purple Cover)

 

Coalescing a mission statement of “wicked women, unholy passions and fire nights” with influences musical, aesthetic, chemical and carnal, NIGHTBITCH are “purveyors of some of the finest occult-themed, sleazed-out, trad-flavored metal around” (CT Indie).

 

NIGHTBITCH formed in the Summer of 2009 when Ipsissimus guitarist Ryan “His Emissary” Adams sought an outlet to reconcile his late-bloomer discovery of Ritchie Blackmore’s majestic emanations with his obsession for sleazy 70’s occult / exploitation films and plagiarized Danzig riffs. Adams soon hooked up with celebrated doom metal vocalist Phil Swanson (Hour of 13, Seamount, Vestal Claret and many more) through mutual friend Bill Connnolly (whose No Visible Scars label would expose the world to NIGHTBITCH via the Sex and Magic cassette). The band was quickly rounded out by the formidable rhythm section of longtime friends and veteran CT musicians Chris Taylor (Kingdom Of Sorrow) and Mark Else (De Omega) on drums and bass, respectively.

In September 2010, after gigs opening for such heavyweights as Pentagram, Black Pyramid, Earthride and Midnight, NIGHTBITCH traveled to Dublin, Ireland as the back-up band for Hour of 13’s live debut at the Dublin Doom Day, playing its own gig as a part of the warm-up festivities. The band brought with it the Sex and Magic cassette, which would sell out of all 100 copies within a month of its release. Upon returning from Dublin, NIGHTBITCH and Swanson amicably parted ways and Taylor assumed vocal duties. In December, Cyclopean Records issued Sex and Magic on vinyl limited to 350 copies, which also sold out in one month’s time. Analog formats exhausted, Sex and Magic has since entered the digital realm via Austria’s Psychedoomelic Records, where it counts the godly Reverend Bizarre among its labelmates.

With Taylor at the helm, NIGHTBITCH has composed eleven infernal odes to comprise its full-length debut and is set to release the Chainmaker EP to showcase the depravity to follow.

http://www.nightbitch.net
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Nightbitch/204735052874021

http://www.reverbnation.com/nightbitch
http://www.twitter.com/NightBitchCT

http://www.earoneproductions.com
https://www.facebook.com/earoneproductions

A Double-SkullBanger Music Review: The Infernal Sea CD: Call of the Augur

Music Review: The Infernal Sea

CD: Call of the Augur

Label: Indie

Available: Now

Call of the Augur cover art

Ok I had to call in back up on this review.  Since this is a Black Metal band and I have never been a big fan I wanted to make sure I gave these guys a fair shake.  So I decided to have a review by me, a outsider, to give a viewpoint from that perspective and a review from Finn buddy Juuso who is a fan of the genre and more informed about it than I am.  And boy am I glad I got Juuso’s input.  After reading Juuso’s review I can tell I’m WAY off in my knowledge of Black Metal or just have a way different taste in what I expect or like. So without further ado read on for the double review.

First we’ll start with Juuso’s review:

Brittish band The Infernal Sea fuses together black and death metal to create a fresh and brutal assault on the genre. This is what the band delivers. What my ears hear is that there are elements from both genres, but this isn’t anything fresh.  Brutal, that’s what it is.

One of the first things to mention is nice cover art. This would be one of the albums I’d take along with me from the record store, if I was deciding to buy records just by genre and album cover. Next thing to praise is the music itself. The Infernal Sea makes their music in possibly the simpliest way possible; guitar, bass, drums and vocals. No keyboards or synths. This is also the way I love black metal the most.

The songs are fast, brutal and evil. The overall sound on the record is kept simple and rough, which I myself find a good point. It adds a little something to the brutality. Perhaps the best part of the music is the vocals. Two different styles that go very well together and both sound rough. The band has done an excellent job by putting together both black and death metal. You can hear the influence of both genres, but there isn’t too much contrast between the two.

I don’t know too many British bands, especially black metal bands, but I must say The Infernal Sea has really caught my attention. Their simple way of making sounds and songs brutal is something truely enjoyable. I can somehow hear small pieces of influences from a bands like Enslaved and Gorgoroth, maybe even Cradle Of Filth.

This album could have been a little bit longer though. It has seven tracks, with five of them being actual songs. One of the albums highlights has been saved to the very end; the short ritual mantra singing at the end of the last track gives me chills.

 GRADE: 4/5

Now we have my review:

Again I will preface this review with the same disclaimer I did with the Cultes Des Ghoules review.  I have never been a giant fan of the Black Metal genre even though I found elements of the genre intriguing.  Such elements as the themes of the songs which touch on ancient gods, devil worship, spells, warlocks and the imagery from the middle ages.  All are things that are very appealing to me for song subjects.  Also the atmosphere Black Metal bands strive to create I think has merit…if they can successfully create it.  However what always turned me off from this form of extreme music was the constant blast beats of drums, the constant shredding of one or two musical notes over and over and the vocals.

Now I know all the above turn offs I mentioned are also the stables of what makes Black Metal, well Black Metal.  If a band didn’t include them then they wouldn’t be in the Black Metal scene for very long and the long dead gods they are supposed to represent would rise from the depths and consume them for their fakery.

So here I am presented with another chance to review a Black Metal release by the UK group The Infernal Sea.  I’m still wanting to broaden my musical tastes as a reviewer much as possible and am still waiting for that one Black Metal Act to convert me over.  So what did we get with the ‘Call of the Augur’ album?

Well surprisingly for me I found several things I liked about this album though I can’t say I am a new convert ready to put on the corpse paint either.  So let’s begin!!

What I found I liked about this album first was that even though we have songs full of the things that always kept me from getting into Black Metal, the album and songs are produced in a way that doesn’t make me just want to turn off the album.  I found the production here was actually well done, an unusual trend for a Black Metal band, since most in this genre opt to make their sound as under produced and “poor” as possible.  I found the songs actually arranged fairly well with breaks in the constant blast beats and one note riffs to hear the talent of Jonathan Egmore on guitars that helped add some depth and leads on some tracks with even a few slow interludes.  Also, we get to hear the excellent talents of The Infernal Sea drummer James Burke, when he isn’t trying to hit the drums faster than light speed.  I was really impressed when I could hear him display his drumming ability in different parts of several songs.

Also what helped keep me listening was the fact all but the last song was reasonable length with only one hitting over the 5 minute mark.  Even the last song that clocks in over 14 minutes, is filled with a lot of ambient sound effects and atmospheric ocean sounds and ships.

Which leads me to this question.  Did I like any of the songs on The Infernal Sea’s, “Call of the Augur”?  Well actually yes I did.  I found I enjoyed ‘Condemned to Psychosis’ …well at least the parts that showcased some nice guitar and drum work.  Also, I think the atmospheric elements of ‘The Gathering’ and ‘Ritual Incantation’ were interesting and like certain parts of Cultes Des Ghoules’ latest effort could fit nice into a bleak and sinister horror film about cultists and dark gods of the unknown.

I can’t say I have been converted yet to Black Metal but I can say if someone asked me about a Black Metal and to check out I could easily recommend The Infernal Sea’s debut album “Call of the Augur”.  Even a non-believer like me can hear the talent that lies within these musicians even though I can’t understand it.

Side Note: Again I will say what I stated in the Cultes Des Ghoules review.  Normally I would give a number review but I don’t think I am educated enough in this genre for that alone to be a fair critique of this band.   The fact I’m not a fan of this genre a number review would be purely from my personal taste for Black Metal, since that would be all I would have to draw from, and that wouldn’t be entirely fair to the band or the fans of the genre.

Music Review: Head of the Demon

Music Review: Head of the Demon

CD: Head of the Demon

Label: The Ajna Offensive

Release Date: January 22, 2013

 

Through the history of Heavy Metal, horror has always been one of its closest allies in terms of subject matter for songs.  However, up until recently you never heard of many bands tap in the H.P. Lovecraft mythos with a few exceptions through the years but in the past decade or so, we seem to be seeing more bands beginning to explore the Cthulhu Mythos a bit more.

When I received a batch of promos that included a band from Sweden, with nameless members from other known bands, called Head of the Demon with music from their self-titled album that the press release stated delved into the Lovecraft them I was sold.  I have always been a big Lovecraft fan, I have read most, if not all, of his stories and have several board games based on the horrors in his stories.  So what do we get with Head of the Demon?  Is it a worthy Lovecraftian Metal endeavor or would we be better served getting Head from a garbage disposal?  Well not to fear…your dick is safe!

When I listened to Head of the Demon the first thing I noticed right off is that this is a VERY Black Sabbath-ish,  psychedelic and doom sounding album with slow plodding and atmospheric songs that would remind you of traveling a desolate grey landscape.  Fans of the old Black Sabbath and stoner type music should enjoy the music found here greatly.  I’m typically not into the slow plodding type Doom Genre but I found myself intrigued by the album and thought it would make some good mood music for certain occasions.

The next noticeable aspect of the album is the vocals.  The press kit states that the singer sounds very much like Tom G. Warrior from Celtic Frost, which I did find to be true but I also found that he also sounded a lot like Cronos from Venom which is not a bad thing and thought it suited the album well.

Head of the Demon is filled with subtle whispers and vocals that are hard to understand at times.  This may be part of what the Doom genre is about but I found I wished I could hear just a little more of the lyrics as it was difficult to really hear the references  to Lovecraft that may have been there.

The song The Key is the one song that has clean narrative/singing where I distinctly heard Lovecraft references compared to the other songs where I wasn’t sure if the songs were referencing Lovecraft or not.

Head of The Demon boasts a mere 7 tracks but in typical metal or doom fashion most songs hit at least the 6 minute mark so you will get your money worth with the seven tracks presented here.

Overall, I was pleasantly surprised by Head of the Demon.  Like I mentioned earlier, I never got into Doom Metal much or claim to be an expert of the genre but I thought what I heard here was a good effort and fans of atmospheric or heavy metal in general should not be disappointed.  So raise your hands high and give praises to the Great Cthulhu.  The Stars are right!

 

Rating: 3/5

 

Tracklisting:

1: By Titan Hand

2: The Lie in Wait-Riding the Waste

3: Phantasmagoria

4: The Man From Foreign Land

5: The Key

6: Fifth House of the Mausoleum

7: Wraith of the Unknown.