Tag Archives: rising force

JEFF SCOTT SOTO On Working With YNGWIE MALMSTEEN – “We Were Helpless Sidemen With No Chance For Growing Or Making Something Of Ourselves While We Were With Him”

Vocalist JEFF SCOTT SOTO (TALISMAN, TRANS-SIBERIAN ORCHESTRA) is featured in a new interview with Greece-based Rock Overdose. An excerpt from the discussion is available below:

Continue reading JEFF SCOTT SOTO On Working With YNGWIE MALMSTEEN – “We Were Helpless Sidemen With No Chance For Growing Or Making Something Of Ourselves While We Were With Him”

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AVANTASIA – Audio Excepts From The Mystery Of Time Available

On March 29th, the new AVANTASIA album, The Mystery Of Time, will hit stores as a regular CD, limited edition vinyl and a limited collector’s deluxe edition.

The Backstage section of Tobiassammet.com is where fans can hear
the first impressions of the album. You have to register first, but it’s all for free.

The cover artwork for The Mystery Of Time, hand-painted by world famous British fantasy painter Rodney Matthews, and the tracklisting can be seen below: Continue reading AVANTASIA – Audio Excepts From The Mystery Of Time Available

Music Review: Avantasia CD: The Mystery of Time

Music Review: Avantasia

CD: The Mystery of Time

Label: Nuclear Blast Records

Availability: March 30th, 2013

by: TJ Fowler

                When I saw that Avantasia was due to release a new album I was immediately interested in giving it a listen as I always found Tobias Sammet to be an excellent singer(and one of the only singers I have heard to sound like Bruce Dickinson) and his other band Edguy I always thought were very talented musicians and songwriters.  I had never listened to a lot of Avantasia before this so I was somewhat going in blind.  So what did I get with Avantasia’s ‘The Mystery of Time’?  Well it wasn’t exactly what I was expecting but it also was by no means a disappointment. Continue reading Music Review: Avantasia CD: The Mystery of Time

YNGWIE MALMSTEEN – Gear Talk With Seymour Duncan In New Video Interview

Guitar legend YNGWIE MALMSTEEN is featured in a new video interview with Seymour Duncan discussing his career, how he achieves his guitar tone, and some playing tips for guitar players.

Malmsteen recently announced a string of North American tour dates in support of his new album, Spellbound. Continue reading YNGWIE MALMSTEEN – Gear Talk With Seymour Duncan In New Video Interview

YNGWIE MALMSTEEN Relentless Shred Guitar Lessons Available

“New and improved” YNGWIE MALMSTEEN Relentless Shred Guitar Lessons are now available at Relentlessshred.com. With Silver, Gold and Maestro plans available you can “learn from The Master whenever you want!”

Joe Charupakorn from Premierguitar.com caught up with Malmsteen recently and talked about his new album, Spellbound. Here are a few excerpts from the chat:

Premierguitar.com: What prompted the decision to play all of the instruments on Spellbound?

Malmsteen: “There was no reason why it happened this way. It just happened. I got inspired, started recording stuff, and all of a sudden it was done.”

Premierguitar.com: Was the process much different on earlier releases?

Malmsteen: “It used to be like a cycle. You’d go into the studio and go through the process of writing, then rehearsing, then drums, then bass. Then when you’re done you mix it, rehearse, and then you go on tour for a year, and then you go back in and do the same thing again. Now it’s different. Even if I go some place like Russia for a gig or two, I keep putting stuff down as I get inspired. And when I hear like 15, 20, or 30— maybe in this case more like 100—things I start thinking, ‘Wow, I have some really good shit here. I should seriously put this together as a record.’ Most of the stuff that you hear on the record is the first time I played it.”

Premierguitar.com: Wow. Is the album mostly first takes?

Malmsteen: “Yeah. I’m not the kind of person that likes to sit and do re-takes. Either it’s good and you keep it or you don’t do it at all. In the studio, especially a rented studio, the spontaneity was always stifled. You sit there and think, “I better not make a [expletive] mistake.” I hated that. Having your own studio is great because you only play when you’re inspired.”

Read more at Premierguitar.com.