Tag Archives: gloom

Music Review: Head of the Demon

Music Review: Head of the Demon

CD: Head of the Demon

Label: The Ajna Offensive

Release Date: January 22, 2013

 

Through the history of Heavy Metal, horror has always been one of its closest allies in terms of subject matter for songs.  However, up until recently you never heard of many bands tap in the H.P. Lovecraft mythos with a few exceptions through the years but in the past decade or so, we seem to be seeing more bands beginning to explore the Cthulhu Mythos a bit more.

When I received a batch of promos that included a band from Sweden, with nameless members from other known bands, called Head of the Demon with music from their self-titled album that the press release stated delved into the Lovecraft them I was sold.  I have always been a big Lovecraft fan, I have read most, if not all, of his stories and have several board games based on the horrors in his stories.  So what do we get with Head of the Demon?  Is it a worthy Lovecraftian Metal endeavor or would we be better served getting Head from a garbage disposal?  Well not to fear…your dick is safe!

When I listened to Head of the Demon the first thing I noticed right off is that this is a VERY Black Sabbath-ish,  psychedelic and doom sounding album with slow plodding and atmospheric songs that would remind you of traveling a desolate grey landscape.  Fans of the old Black Sabbath and stoner type music should enjoy the music found here greatly.  I’m typically not into the slow plodding type Doom Genre but I found myself intrigued by the album and thought it would make some good mood music for certain occasions.

The next noticeable aspect of the album is the vocals.  The press kit states that the singer sounds very much like Tom G. Warrior from Celtic Frost, which I did find to be true but I also found that he also sounded a lot like Cronos from Venom which is not a bad thing and thought it suited the album well.

Head of the Demon is filled with subtle whispers and vocals that are hard to understand at times.  This may be part of what the Doom genre is about but I found I wished I could hear just a little more of the lyrics as it was difficult to really hear the references  to Lovecraft that may have been there.

The song The Key is the one song that has clean narrative/singing where I distinctly heard Lovecraft references compared to the other songs where I wasn’t sure if the songs were referencing Lovecraft or not.

Head of The Demon boasts a mere 7 tracks but in typical metal or doom fashion most songs hit at least the 6 minute mark so you will get your money worth with the seven tracks presented here.

Overall, I was pleasantly surprised by Head of the Demon.  Like I mentioned earlier, I never got into Doom Metal much or claim to be an expert of the genre but I thought what I heard here was a good effort and fans of atmospheric or heavy metal in general should not be disappointed.  So raise your hands high and give praises to the Great Cthulhu.  The Stars are right!

 

Rating: 3/5

 

Tracklisting:

1: By Titan Hand

2: The Lie in Wait-Riding the Waste

3: Phantasmagoria

4: The Man From Foreign Land

5: The Key

6: Fifth House of the Mausoleum

7: Wraith of the Unknown.

IRON MAIDEN Singer At Queen Mary University In London; Video Interview Posted Online

Bruce Dickinson, lead singer of legendary rock group IRON MAIDEN, took to the stage of the Great Hall at Queen Mary university in London, England on November 20, 2012. Dr Dickinson, who is a Queen Mary History alumnus, rock star, airline pilot and aviation business owner, was keynote speaker at an event featuring entrepreneurs who studied or worked at the university.

Dickinson’s keynote speech focused on what it means to be an entrepreneur, from his first forays into business at 12 years old with a “rent a pencil” scheme at school. He advised guests at the Innovation Forum that to be a success they will have to show great determination and energy, sacrifice sleep and always remember why they started their own business in the first place.

While “most things have already been discovered,” Dickinson told budding entrepreneurs to look at things from a fresh perspective. “What an entrepreneur sees is opportunities and the world in a different way,” he said. “Most things in the world have been discovered, but an entrepreneur will see an opportunity and how to look at things from a different direction.

“Business is really about building and facilitating relationships,” he continued. “Remember that without the customer, your invention or idea is nonsense. You also need to know your limitations and what you can and can’t do, take time to pick the right partners and to trust them.”

Dickinson, whose father was a used car salesman and an engineer, advised guests to “look at the bigger picture” and get back up again after taking knocks. He also touched on the issue of illegal downloads, commenting that the music industry is “crying into its beer.” With music inevitably becoming a free commodity, he noted that there continues to be a demand for merchandise.

A video interview with Dickinson, conducted during his visit to the Queen Mary university, can be seen below.

Dickinson received an honorary doctorate in music from Queen Mary in July 2011 (see photo below). He was presented by Professor David Baker of the Centre For Neuroscience And Trauma in honor of Dr. Dickinson‘s contribution to the music industry.

Dickinson, 54, actually received a degree in history from the same college in 1979. His parents wanted him in the army, but he told them that he wanted to get a degree first. “That was what they wanted to hear so that was my cover story,” he later said. “When I got down there, I started immediately finding and playing in bands.”

Multi-talented Dr. Dickinson is not only a musician and songwriter, author, film script writer and TV broadcaster, also a champion fencer, entrepreneur and commercial airline pilot. In 2006, Dr. Dickinson flew 200 U.K. citizens home from Lebanon during the Israel-Hezbollah conflict in his converted Boeing 757.

Queen Mary is one of the U.K.’s leading research-focused universities, offering a broad range of degrees in humanities and social sciences; medicine and dentistry and science and engineering, with over 14,000 undergraduates, 2,000 postgraduate students and 3,000 staff.